Wednesday, September 03, 2008

Saturday, July 26

My day started on a high note after I received an email from a
contributing editor of The San Fransisco Chronicle. He told me that a
question I had posted for an interview of a financial adviser was used
used in a story earlier that day. After reading the interview, we
walked up to the tracks and headed to Manhattan.



Our first stop of the day was the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.


The
main exhibit at the museum featured the work of Louise Bourgeois.
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Bourgeois). The building itself
was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and I was more impressed with the
design and layout of the museum than Louise's contorted "Bodies" and
"Cells".
From New York City



There was much more at the museum than the work of Louise.
Works from Vasily Kandinsky, Fernand L├ęger and Ad Reinhardt were also
on display. Ad Reinhard's "Ultimate" was something that at first, I
walked passed with only a glance. Then, after listening to an
explanation of his painting I went back and began to see all the
detail in the seemingless solid black canvas. It was an amazing
experience. Photography was not allowed in the upper floors of the
building, and it was amusing to see the extent that museum patrons
took to take a photo.
A few times, some patrons, who didn't take much care to hide the
camera were severely scolded in front of everyone by the security
staff.
From New York City



We left the museum early in the afternoon and walked along 5th Avenue
and entered Central Park. We walked along a path that encircled the
Jaquelyn Kennedy Onassis Reservoir.
From New York City



It seemed to me that everyone on
this path was determined to win the New York City Marathon. Everyone
was wearing logo sports wear and running really fast. We didn't want
hold back the party, so we found a back road that ran parallel to the
path and took it all the way till we exited on the other side of the
park at Central Park West. We walked down till we arrived at the
massive American Museum of Natural History.


Continued in Part 9

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